October is National Bullying Prevention Month!
Being at risk for bullying doesn’t mean there is a problem. Watch for warning signs that kids are involved in bullying. If your school is not adequately addressing harassment based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or religion, contact the School superintendent,  the State Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, or Call 911.
There are many warning signs that may indicate that someone is affected by bullying—either being bullied or bullying others.
If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7. No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 


#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

Being at risk for bullying doesn’t mean there is a problem. Watch for warning signs that kids are involved in bullying. If your school is not adequately addressing harassment based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or religion, contact the School superintendent,  the State Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, or Call 911.

There are many warning signs that may indicate that someone is affected by bullying—either being bullied or bullying others.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!
What Does Bullying Look Like?
Direct Bullying Behaviors
Physical Bullying (a few examples)
Hitting, slapping, elbowing, shouldering (slamming someone with your shoulder)
Shoving in a hurtful or embarrassing way
Kicking
Taking, stealing, damaging or defacing belongings or other property
Restraining
Pinching
Flushing someone’s head in the toilet
Cramming someone into his or her locke
Attacking with spit wads or food
Verbal Bullying (a few examples)
Name-calling
Insulting remarks and put-downs
Repeated teasing
Racist remarks or other harassment
Threats and intimidation
Whispering behind someone’s back
Indirect Bullying Behaviors
Social/Relational (a few examples)
Destroying and manipulating relationships (turning your best friend against you)
Destroying status within a peer group
Destroying reputations
Humiliation and embarrassment
Intimidation
Gossiping, spreading nasty and malicious rumors and lies about someone
Hurtful graffiti
Excluding someone from a group (social rejection or isolation)
Stealing boyfriends or girlfriends to hurt someone
Negative body language (facial expressions, turning your back to someone)
Threatening gestures, taunting, pestering, insulting remarks and gestures
Glares and dirty looks, nasty jokes, notes passed around, anonymous notes
Hate petitions (promising to hate someone)
Other Bullying Behaviors
Cyber bullying: negative text messages on cell phones, e-mail, or voice-mail messages, Web pages, and so on Direct and indirect forms of bullying often occur together. All of these behaviors can be interrelated.
Bullying can affect everyone—those who are bullied, those who bully, and those who witness bullying. Learn how to respond to bullying.
If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7. No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

What Does Bullying Look Like?

Direct Bullying Behaviors

Physical Bullying (a few examples)

  • Hitting, slapping, elbowing, shouldering (slamming someone with your shoulder)
  • Shoving in a hurtful or embarrassing way
  • Kicking
  • Taking, stealing, damaging or defacing belongings or other property
  • Restraining
  • Pinching
  • Flushing someone’s head in the toilet
  • Cramming someone into his or her locke
  • Attacking with spit wads or food

Verbal Bullying (a few examples)

  • Name-calling
  • Insulting remarks and put-downs
  • Repeated teasing
  • Racist remarks or other harassment
  • Threats and intimidation
  • Whispering behind someone’s back

Indirect Bullying Behaviors

Social/Relational (a few examples)

  • Destroying and manipulating relationships (turning your best friend against you)
  • Destroying status within a peer group
  • Destroying reputations
  • Humiliation and embarrassment
  • Intimidation
  • Gossiping, spreading nasty and malicious rumors and lies about someone
  • Hurtful graffiti
  • Excluding someone from a group (social rejection or isolation)
  • Stealing boyfriends or girlfriends to hurt someone
  • Negative body language (facial expressions, turning your back to someone)
  • Threatening gestures, taunting, pestering, insulting remarks and gestures
  • Glares and dirty looks, nasty jokes, notes passed around, anonymous notes
  • Hate petitions (promising to hate someone)

Other Bullying Behaviors

  • Cyber bullying: negative text messages on cell phones, e-mail, or voice-mail messages, Web pages, and so on Direct and indirect forms of bullying often occur together. All of these behaviors can be interrelated.

Bullying can affect everyone—those who are bullied, those who bully, and those who witness bullying. Learn how to respond to bullying.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) youth and those perceived as LGBT are at an increased risk of being bullied. There are important and unique considerations for strategies to prevent and address bullying of LGBT youth. Educators, health professionals, parents, and other concerned adults can make a difference in the lives of LGBT youth. Often, bullying towards LGBT youth targets their non-conformity to gender norms. This may be sexual harassment covered under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Be more than a bystander by helping a peer who is being bullied get away from the situation.
If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7. No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 


#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) youth and those perceived as LGBT are at an increased risk of being bullied. There are important and unique considerations for strategies to prevent and address bullying of LGBT youth. Educators, health professionals, parents, and other concerned adults can make a difference in the lives of LGBT youth. Often, bullying towards LGBT youth targets their non-conformity to gender norms. This may be sexual harassment covered under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Be more than a bystander by helping a peer who is being bullied get away from the situation.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!
Why Do Students Keep Bullying a Secret?
They are taught not to “tattle.” They think telling someone they are being hurt orsomeone else is being hurt is wrong.
They have told or heard someone else tell adults about bullying before, and nothing was done about it.
They are afraid adults will make the situation worse.
They are embarrassed or feel shame because they feel no one likes them; they feel defective.
They feel shame because they cannot stand up for themselves as they have been taught.
They do not want to worry their parents. They love their parents and want to protect them from worry and anxiety.
Prevent bullying by setting a good example and modeling how to treat others with kindness and respect.
If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7. No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

Why Do Students Keep Bullying a Secret?

  • They are taught not to “tattle.” They think telling someone they are being hurt orsomeone else is being hurt is wrong.
  • They have told or heard someone else tell adults about bullying before, and nothing was done about it.
  • They are afraid adults will make the situation worse.
  • They are embarrassed or feel shame because they feel no one likes them; they feel defective.
  • They feel shame because they cannot stand up for themselves as they have been taught.
  • They do not want to worry their parents. They love their parents and want to protect them from worry and anxiety.

Prevent bullying by setting a good example and modeling how to treat others with kindness and respect.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!
- It is estimated that 160,000 children miss school every day due to fear of attack or intimidation by other students. Source: National Education Association.
- American schools harbor approximately 2.1 million bullies and 2.7 million of their victims. Dan Olweus, National School Safety Center.
- 1 in 7 Students in Grades K-12 is either a bully or a victim of bullying.
- 56% of students have personally witnessed some type of bullying at school.
- 15% of all school absenteeism is directly related to fears of being bullied at school.
- 71% of students report incidents of bullying as a problem at their school.
- 1 out of 20 students has seen a student with a gun at school.
- 282,000 students are physically attacked in secondary schools each month.
- Those in the lower grades reported being in twice as many fights as those in the higher grades. However, there is a lower rate of serious violent crimes in the elementary level than in the middle or high schools.
- 90% of 4th through 8th graders report being victims of bullying
- Among students, homicide perpetrators were more than twice as likely as homicide victims to have been bullied by peers.
- Bullying statistics say revenge is the strongest motivation for school shootings.
- 87% of students said shootings are motivated by a desire to “get back at those who have hurt them.”
- 86% of students said, “other kids picking on them, making fun of them or bullying them” causes teenagers to turn to lethal violence in the schools.
- 61% of students said students shoot others because they have been victims of physical abuse at home.
- 54% of students said witnessing physical abuse at home can lead to violence in school.
- According to bullying statistics, 1 out of every 10 students who drops out of school does so because of repeated bullying.
- Harassment and bullying have been linked to 75% of school-shooting incidents.
Although no federal law directly addresses bullying, in some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment when it is based on race, national origin, color, sex, age, disability, or religion. When bullying and harassment overlap, federally-funded schools including colleges and universities have an obligation to resolve the harassment. When the situation is not adequately resolved, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division may be able to help.
Each state addresses bullying differently. Find out how your state refers to bullying in its laws and what they require on part of schools and districts.
If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7. No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 
#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

- It is estimated that 160,000 children miss school every day due to fear of attack or intimidation by other students. Source: National Education Association.

- American schools harbor approximately 2.1 million bullies and 2.7 million of their victims. Dan Olweus, National School Safety Center.

- 1 in 7 Students in Grades K-12 is either a bully or a victim of bullying.

- 56% of students have personally witnessed some type of bullying at school.

- 15% of all school absenteeism is directly related to fears of being bullied at school.

- 71% of students report incidents of bullying as a problem at their school.

- 1 out of 20 students has seen a student with a gun at school.

- 282,000 students are physically attacked in secondary schools each month.

- Those in the lower grades reported being in twice as many fights as those in the higher grades. However, there is a lower rate of serious violent crimes in the elementary level than in the middle or high schools.

- 90% of 4th through 8th graders report being victims of bullying

- Among students, homicide perpetrators were more than twice as likely as homicide victims to have been bullied by peers.

- Bullying statistics say revenge is the strongest motivation for school shootings.

- 87% of students said shootings are motivated by a desire to “get back at those who have hurt them.”

- 86% of students said, “other kids picking on them, making fun of them or bullying them” causes teenagers to turn to lethal violence in the schools.

- 61% of students said students shoot others because they have been victims of physical abuse at home.

- 54% of students said witnessing physical abuse at home can lead to violence in school.

- According to bullying statistics, 1 out of every 10 students who drops out of school does so because of repeated bullying.

- Harassment and bullying have been linked to 75% of school-shooting incidents.

Although no federal law directly addresses bullying, in some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment when it is based on race, national origin, color, sex, age, disability, or religion. When bullying and harassment overlap, federally-funded schools including colleges and universities have an obligation to resolve the harassment. When the situation is not adequately resolved, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division may be able to help.

Each state addresses bullying differently. Find out how your state refers to bullying in its laws and what they require on part of schools and districts.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!
Cyberbullying happens when people bully each other through electronic technology. Find out why cyberbullying is different from traditional bullying, what you can do to prevent it, and how you can report cyberbullying when it happens.
When cyberbullying happens, it is important to document and report the behavior so it can be addressed.
If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7. No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 
#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

Cyberbullying happens when people bully each other through electronic technology. Find out why cyberbullying is different from traditional bullying, what you can do to prevent it, and how you can report cyberbullying when it happens.

When cyberbullying happens, it is important to document and report the behavior so it can be addressed.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

There are many warning signs that may indicate that someone is affected by bullying—either being bullied or bullying others.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!
Every day, kids see bullying. They want to help, but don’t know how. Here are a few simple and safe ways that your child can help someone who’s being bullied and be more than a bystander:
Children can help someone who’s been bullied by simply being nice to them at another time. Being friendly can go a long way toward letting them know that they’re not alone.
An adult can help stop bullying by intervening while it’s in progress, stopping it from occurring or simply giving the person being bullied a shoulder to lean on.
There are a few simple, safe ways children can help the person being bullied get away from the situation. However they do it, make sure the child knows not to put themselves in harm’s way.
If one of your child’s friends or peers begins to bully someone, they shouldn’t encourage the behavior by giving it an audience. Instead of laughing or supporting, they can let the bully know that his or her behavior isn’t entertaining.
Bullying can affect everyone—those who are bullied, those who bully, and those who witness bullying. Learn how to respond to bullying.
If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7. No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 


#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

Every day, kids see bullying. They want to help, but don’t know how. Here are a few simple and safe ways that your child can help someone who’s being bullied and be more than a bystander:

Children can help someone who’s been bullied by simply being nice to them at another time. Being friendly can go a long way toward letting them know that they’re not alone.

An adult can help stop bullying by intervening while it’s in progress, stopping it from occurring or simply giving the person being bullied a shoulder to lean on.

There are a few simple, safe ways children can help the person being bullied get away from the situation. However they do it, make sure the child knows not to put themselves in harm’s way.

If one of your child’s friends or peers begins to bully someone, they shouldn’t encourage the behavior by giving it an audience. Instead of laughing or supporting, they can let the bully know that his or her behavior isn’t entertaining.

Bullying can affect everyone—those who are bullied, those who bully, and those who witness bullying. Learn how to respond to bullying.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!
There are two types of student bullying victims: Passive or Submissive and Provocative
Note: Parents and school personnel should avoid speaking about these characteristics as weaknesses.
Typical Characteristics of Passive or Submissive Students who are Bullied:
They are generally quiet, cautious, sensitive, and perhaps easily moved to tears.
They are insecure and have little self-confidence (negative self-esteem), perhaps as the result of bullying.
If boys, they are usually physically weaker than their classmates, particularly the bullies, and they do not like to fight.
They have few or no friends, perhaps as a result of bullying.
They may be afraid of getting hurt or hurting themselves.
They find it easier to associate with adults than peers.
Typical Characteristics of Provocative Students who are Bullied:
Only 15 to 20 percent of victims are of this type.
They are often bullied more often and by more peers than passive or submissivevictims.
They have tempers and may try to fight back if bullied, but usually withoutsuccess.
They are restless, clumsy, immature, unfocused, and generally perceived asawkward or tiresome. Some are hyperactive; they may be fidgety, impulsive, orrestless and have difficulty concentrating.
They may have reading and writing problems.
They may be disliked by adults because of their often irritating behavior.
They may try to bully weaker students and therefore may be both victims andbullies.
Some are popular, and some are not. Their popularity may decrease in highergrades, but it never reaches the lowest popularity levels.
Be more than a bystander by helping a peer who is being bullied get away from the situation.
If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7. No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

There are two types of student bullying victims: Passive or Submissive and Provocative

Note: Parents and school personnel should avoid speaking about these characteristics as weaknesses.

Typical Characteristics of Passive or Submissive Students who are Bullied:

  • They are generally quiet, cautious, sensitive, and perhaps easily moved to tears.
  • They are insecure and have little self-confidence (negative self-esteem), perhaps as the result of bullying.
  • If boys, they are usually physically weaker than their classmates, particularly the bullies, and they do not like to fight.
  • They have few or no friends, perhaps as a result of bullying.
  • They may be afraid of getting hurt or hurting themselves.
  • They find it easier to associate with adults than peers.

Typical Characteristics of Provocative Students who are Bullied:

  • Only 15 to 20 percent of victims are of this type.
  • They are often bullied more often and by more peers than passive or submissive
    victims.
  • They have tempers and may try to fight back if bullied, but usually without
    success.
  • They are restless, clumsy, immature, unfocused, and generally perceived as
    awkward or tiresome. Some are hyperactive; they may be fidgety, impulsive, or
    restless and have difficulty concentrating.
  • They may have reading and writing problems.
  • They may be disliked by adults because of their often irritating behavior.
  • They may try to bully weaker students and therefore may be both victims and
    bullies.
  • Some are popular, and some are not. Their popularity may decrease in higher
    grades, but it never reaches the lowest popularity levels.

Be more than a bystander by helping a peer who is being bullied get away from the situation.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!
Focus on behavior, not the label.
There are several important reasons to avoid using labels like bully and victim.
The labels bully, victim, and target are used often by media, researchers and others to refer to children who bully others and children who are bullied. 
Using labels may suggest that bullying is purely the “fault” of the child and allow us to ignore other factors that contribute to bullying behavior.
Prevent bullying by setting a good example and modeling how to treat others with kindness and respect.
If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7. No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 


#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

Focus on behavior, not the label.

There are several important reasons to avoid using labels like bully and victim.

The labels bullyvictim, and target are used often by media, researchers and others to refer to children who bully others and children who are bullied. 

Using labels may suggest that bullying is purely the “fault” of the child and allow us to ignore other factors that contribute to bullying behavior.

Prevent bullying by setting a good example and modeling how to treat others with kindness and respect.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

Although no federal law directly addresses bullying, in some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment when it is based on race, national origin, color, sex, age, disability, or religion. When bullying and harassment overlap, federally-funded schools including colleges and universities have an obligation to resolve the harassment. When the situation is not adequately resolved, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division may be able to help.

Each state addresses bullying differently. Find out how your state refers to bullying in its laws and what they require on part of schools and districts.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!

October is National Bullying Prevention Month!

Prevent bullying by setting a good example and modeling how to treat others with kindness and respect.

If you have been the victim of hate, of any kind, it is not your fault. Please do not suffer in silence because there are people who can help: Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area,anytime 24/7No matter what problems you are dealing with, we want to help you find a reason to keep living. 

#NoMoreBullies Together we can make it stop!